Christopher Latham Sholes’ Lasting Impact

Christopher Latham Sholes’ Lasting Impact

One hundred forty years ago today, an invention was patented that few of us could live without, even if we might want to. Despite significant advances in technology over the past century and a half, most of us experience the work of Christopher Latham Sholes every workday.


TRANSCRIPT

One hundred forty years ago today, an invention was patented that few of us could live without, even if we might want to. Despite significant advances in technology over the past century and a half, most of us experience the work of Christopher Latham Sholes every workday.

A newspaperman and politician in Wisconsin, Sholes came up with a device that would eventually change how we all work. Four years after receiving the patent, Sholes sold the rights to his invention to the Remington Arms Company for the sum of $12,000, an amount equal to about $210,000 today.

You see, the typewriter with its so-called QWERTY keyboard was born on this date in history. Though few Americans find themselves using a traditional ink and ribbon typewriter anymore, most still peck away at the same keyboard layout on our computers, and we have Christopher Latham Sholes to thank – or curse – for that.

I’m Chip Griffin, and this has been another Chip Shot.